November 17, 2018

2018 New Year’s Eve Party

New and Special this Year

For 40 people only, 2018 New Year's Eve party will start 2 hours earlier, at 6 PM on December 31st. Our own gourmet chefs Karl and Linda will be serving Slow Cooked Pork Roast, unlike anything you've ever had before! Once done, the meat is falling-apart tender. It takes more than 24 hours to cook out-of-this-world meal like that. Dinner will also include veggies, salad, dessert and a glass of wine.

Cost: $22.50/person.

Tickets available this Saturday, December 1st through December 15th - or until they sell out - whichever comes first. No tickets will be sold at the door.

For everyone who prefers to bring their own snacks, the party starts at 8 PM, as usually.

For all the details, keep reading - or scroll down.

Traditional 2018 New Year's Eve Party

2018 New Year's Eve Party hosted by German American Friendship Society of Pinellas County is a traditional event, open to public. Since the seating is limited, please purchase tickets in advance.

  • Date and time: Saturday, December 31st, 2018. Doors open at 8 PM.

  • Live Music by: Manni Daum

  • Admission: $25/person for members, $28/person for guests.

  • Reservations: Tickets go on sale on December 1st, 2018. Make sure to purchase them in advance.

  • Food and drinks: Bring your own snacks. At midnight we serve a complimentary glass of champagne, then coffee and lentil soup. Our full-service cash bar will be open and well stocked with variety of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Mixed drinks and tap beers are also available.

  • So, come and waltz with us into a new year in the cozy, friendly environment, with fun-loving people!

A Few Photos from 2015 New Year's Eve Party

2015 New Year's Eve Party - Photo © 2015 Daria Perse -
Just Having Fun - Photo © 2015 Daria Perse
Fun on New Year's Eve - Photo © 2015 Daria Perse
German American Friendship Society of Pinellas County - Photo © 2015 Daria Perse
Sepp & Heinz and Tony Klepec playing on New Year's Eve - Photo © 2015 Daria Perse
Happy Guests at the German Club on New Year's - Photo © 2015 Daria Perse

A Brief History of New Year's Eve Celebration

"In 45 B.C., New Year’s Day is celebrated on January 1 for the first time in history as the Julian calendar takes effect.

Soon after becoming Roman dictator, Julius Caesar decided that the traditional Roman calendar was in dire need of reform. Introduced around the seventh century B.C., the Roman calendar attempted to follow the lunar cycle but frequently fell out of phase with the seasons and had to be corrected. In addition, the pontifices, the Roman body charged with overseeing the calendar, often abused its authority by adding days to extend political terms or interfere with elections.

In designing his new calendar, Caesar enlisted the aid of Sosigenes, an Alexandrian astronomer, who advised him to do away with the lunar cycle entirely and follow the solar year, as did the Egyptians."

"Celebration of New Year’s Day in January fell out of practice during the Middle Ages, and even those who strictly adhered to the Julian calendar did not observe the New Year exactly on January 1. The reason for the latter was that Caesar and Sosigenes failed to calculate the correct value for the solar year as 365.242199 days, not 365.25 days. Thus, an 11-minute-a-year error added seven days by the year 1000, and 10 days by the mid-15th century.

The Roman church became aware of this problem, and in the 1570s Pope Gregory XIII commissioned Jesuit astronomer Christopher Clavius to come up with a new calendar. In 1582, the Gregorian calendar was implemented, omitting 10 days for that year and establishing the new rule that only one of every four centennial years should be a leap year. Since then, people around the world have gathered en masse on January 1 to celebrate the precise arrival of the New Year."
Source


Daria

Daria is a SunFlower by nature, on a mission to shine the light of beauty and happiness on this world in the same way that the Sun spreads its warmth.

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